FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 27, 2015

CONTACT: Travis Smith (907) 258-3077

Murkowski and Sullivan don't always vote together, but when they do, it's not for Alaska

Murkowski and Sullivan both vote against the best interests of Alaskans during late night Budget votes.

ANCHORAGE: Murkowski started off the “vote-a-rama” on the right foot, voting for Sen. Murray’s (D-WA) amendment to establish paid sick leave. However, she ended the night by joining Dan Sullivan and voting NAY on a series of key budget amendments. Together, Sullivan and Murkowski said no to keeping jobs in the United States, no to equal pay for women, no to Social Security & Medicare, and no to affordable higher education. Instead they both went along with their party and passed a budget with, “deep safety net cuts.”

Murkowski and Sullivan both voted NAY on:

  • Amendment 523: To prevent United States companies from getting tax benefits for moving jobs overseas, to end offshore tax loopholes including inversions, and to provide incentives for United States companies to relocate overseas jobs to the United States.
  • Amendment 362: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to amending the Equal Pay Act of 1963 to allow for punitive damages, limit the any factor "other than sex" exception, and prohibit retaliation against employees who share salary information.
  • Amendment 471: To create a point of order against legislation that would cut benefits, raise the retirement age, or privatize social security.
  • Amendment 828: To provide additional resources to save student financial aid and keep college affordable for more than 8,000,000 low- and middle-income students by restoring the $89,000,000,000 in cuts to Federal Pell Grants in the Republican budget.
  • Amendment 432: To provide additional resources to create the opportunity for more Americans to obtain a higher education and advanced job skills by supporting two free years of community college paid for by raising revenue through requiring millionaires and billionaires to pay their fair share.

“Alaska stands to lose a lot if this budget becomes law,” said Mike Wenstrup, chair of the Alaska Democratic Party.

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